Sit right down; or, On Handwriting

My mother died recently, and I was grateful for all the emails, phone calls, and Facebook comments, people moved to reach out to me, to touch, electronically. I was moved. And I was amazed that a ton of people sent me cards. It was so lovely to receive these bits of paper and color through the, let’s face it, miracle of the US Postal Service. It was startling and thrilling to see, of all things, people’s handwriting! The loops of one friend, the scratch of another dear soul.

Wow. That all these people took the time to stand in front of a selection of cards at some store, trying not to breathe in someone else’s Covid germs, debating whether this card was too sappy, that one too cute, then took it home and, I would bet, to a person, paused, pen clutched in curled fingers, thinking “what on earth will I say??” And then they commenced, and said in black pen or blue all number of lovely things, including just “thinking of you,” which was true and warming.

And the signatures! Do I sound like a lunatic?

But this evidence of our selves, our scrawly names. In these typefaced days of electronic signatures and stock emojis, of typing someone’s address or phone number into your phone rather than have them scribble it on a scrap of paper, the distinctiveness of handwriting has been hidden. It exists. We all haven’t collectively forgotten how to write. Although I do hear that children are no longer taught to write cursive. We all still, at some point or another, put pen point to paper, and the heft of pen and hand and arm, the wick of inkpoint, the tautness or looseness of loop or line are an intimate part of us.

It was a tender moment for me to see this evidence of my friends on paper, to see in their lines, thick or thin, even or jiggly, their thoughts of me, and of course, as the death of a mother is a big event for everyone, their thoughts from within themselves and their own experience of loss or the anticipation thereof. Stunning.

So if not today someday soon find a reason to send someone a card with your own chickenscratch inside. It seems, the sending of a card, to be an isolated event of individual effort, but upon receipt it becomes a shared experience, an art, a dance of ink-to-eye and mind-to-mind. And we need such small personal actions in the cold world. Sometimes Times New Roman and smiley faces are a bit too stiff. They hide us, the skinny scrawl or thick slash of us sprawled on paper like a grin or a grimace or a wink and a smile.

4 thoughts on “Sit right down; or, On Handwriting

  1. Hi Marilyn, I appreciated this post. I love handwriting too and have boxes of letters from my mother, siblings, friends. They are quite remarkable artifacts, especially once they’ve survived a few decades and too many moves. Save those cards ❤

    On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 3:31 PM O Write: Marilynonaroll’s Blog wrote:

    > marmcc posted: ” My mother died recently, and I was grateful for all the > emails, phone calls, and Facebook comments, people moved to reach out to > me, to touch, electronically. I was moved. And I was amazed that a ton of > people sent me cards. It was so lovely to receive t” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I feel for you deeply, and send those “thinking of you” meanings; it’s so lovely that you could find in your period of loss such evidence of closeness and caring. I felt the same, receiving cards when my father died last year. I kept the cards and recently have been sorting through letters and ephemera going back decades. I am not a sentimental person, but the handwritten stuff especially is evoking memories of individuals–their loops, scrawls, specific details…you remind me to appreciate that. These days I appreciate the handwritten note more than ever.

    Like

  3. Pingback: Poetry Blog Digest 2021, Week 5 – Via Negativa

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