I’m Rubber, I’m Glue; or How Mindset Affects Action

In the ever-astonishing Brain Pickings, Maria Popova’s treasure trove of ideas delivered right to my email inbox, I read some excerpts from Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck. Dweck’s idea is that there are two types of mindsets that people have about themselves, mindsets that shape how we think about ourselves and the challenges we meet in life: the fixed mindset and the growth mindset. She says this: “When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world — the world of fixed traits — success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other — the world of changing qualities — it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself. In one world, failure is about having a setback….It means you’re not smart or talented. In the other world, failure is about not growing. Not reaching for the things you value. It means you’re not fulfilling your potential.”

And as usual these days when I consider something presented as a duality, I think, yes, and yes; therefore, no, the idea of a duality is just not appropriate. Spectrum, maybe. Spiral, perhaps. Of two minds, probably.

At any given moment, confronted with any particular challenge, I enter both those mindsets. What I do next depends on which one wins, which one wins depends on any number of factors, including how motivated I am with regard to the particular challenge, how distracted I am by something else outside of the particular challenge (hunger, having to pee, whatever), who I’m imagining is my judge and jury if I am imagining one, and what the next required step might be.

I used to play a fair amount of tennis and never got much better at it. At first I had a growth mindset, then, after I while, I had a fuckit mindset. I mean, a fixed mindset. Fixed on never playing that stupid fucking game again.

Often when I get a writing rejection, my thinking goes something like this: oh-crap-why-do-I-suck-I’m-so-not-good-enough-not-smart-enough-I- quit-okay-well-wait-maybe-I’ve-learned-X-about-this-and-so-I’m-going-to-try-this-new-approach. Or sometimes I think: okay-I’ve-tried-X-and-Y-and-Z-and-learned-these-things-but-I’m-not-achieving-what-I-want-and-seem-not-to-be-particularly-good-at-this-and-am-tired-of-trying-so-I’m-going-to-stop.

I might switch those spectrum-movements in a few months, quitting one thing, restarting another.

I don’t feel particularly better about myself when I’ve worked hard at something versus if I’ve unexpectedly achieved something with ease. I don’t always want to think of every challenge as something that can help me grow. Often I would like things to come easily to me. But I also work at things, and I am nothing if not resilient. I’m a quitter from way back — quitting jobs, relationships, stupid tennis. But I’m also an avid learner, and work hard at things I’m interested in working hard at. I wallow in self-pity; I churn forward fearlessly. I worry about people judging me; I have no concern at all about people judging me. I’m convinced of my own success; I am equally convinced of my impending failure. And so it goes.

So I wish these studies didn’t always focus on dualities and instead recognize that we’re all, as one friend termed me, “a symphony of contradictions.”

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3 thoughts on “I’m Rubber, I’m Glue; or How Mindset Affects Action

  1. Pingback: Difficult books, iterum « ann e michael

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